From This Day Forward
http://www.fromthisdayforwardfilm.com/
Directed by Sharon Shattuck
Produced by Martha Shane and Sharon Shattuck
USA, 2015, 76 min, in English

FROM THIS DAY FORWARD is the story of a love, and a family, that survived the most intimate of transformations.

"Personal, insightful and gently humorous."
Toronto Star



PREVIOUS SCREENINGS

Boston, MA
September 29, 2016
Museum of Fine Arts Boston

Sebastopol, CA
September 21, 2016
Rialto Cinemas Sebastopol

Amherst, MA
September 21, 2016
Amherst Cinema
*Director Sharon Shattuck in person

San Francisco, CA
July 15-21, 2016
Roxie Theater

San Diego, CA
July 8-14, 2016
Digital Gym

New York, NY
June 24-30, 2016
IFC Center
*Director Sharon Shattuck and her father Trisha in person 6/24 & 6/25

St. Louis, MO
June 17-19, 2016
Webster University Film Series

Columbus, OH
June 10-16, 2016
Gateway Film Center

Helena, MT
June 3-9, 2016
Myrna Loy Film Center

Chicago, IL
May 20-26, 2016
Facets

Seattle, WA
May 15, 2016
Translations: The Seattle Transgender Film Festival 

Pittsfield, MA
May 13-16, 2016
Little Cinema at the Berkshire Museum

New York, NY
May 10, 2016
NewFest at The Center

Winston-Salem, NC
May 3, 2016
Aperture Cinema

Portland, ME
April 14, 2016
Space Gallery
Skype Q&A with Trisha and director Sharon Shattuck

Portland, OR
April 11, 2016
Hollywood Theatre

Annapolis, MD
March 31-April 6, 2016
Annapolis Film Festival

Brattleboro, VT
March 11-20, 2016
Women’s Film Festival

Decorah, IA
March 4-6, 2016
Oneota Film Festival

Pasadena, CA
February 27, 2016
Level Ground Film Festival

SYNOPSIS

SHORT SYNOPSIS

With her own wedding just around the corner, filmmaker Sharon Shattuck returns home to examine the mystery at the heart of her upbringing: How her transgender father Trisha and her straight-identified mother Marcia stayed together against all odds. FROM THIS DAY FORWARD is a moving portrayal of an American family coping with the most intimate of transformations.

LONG SYNOPSIS

FROM THIS DAY FORWARD is a moving portrayal of an American family coping with the most intimate of transformations. When filmmaker Sharon Shattuck's artist father came out as transgender and changed her name to Trisha, her transition was difficult for her straight-identified, physician wife, Marcia, to accept. Having married and fallen in love with a man, Marcia found herself doubting whether she could love Trisha as a woman. And, as a heterosexual woman, she felt that the idea of walking down the street, holding hands with a woman, would paint a false picture of her own identity. At the time, with Sharon in her preteen years and focused on developing her own sense of self, her parents’ relationship seemed a mystery. After announcing that they would get a divorce, Marcia and Trisha found themselves heartbroken and decided that they loved each other too much to separate. Committed to staying together as a family, they then began a careful balancing act that would test their love for one another, and ultimately prove even more challenging than expected. As Sharon approaches her own wedding day, she begins asking the questions she couldn’t ask as a child: Why did her father choose to transition when she and her sister were so young? How—and why—did her parents decide to stay together? As the film evolves into a conversation about love and acceptance in a modern American family, it raises questions relevant to all of us: As individuals, how do we adapt to sustain longterm love and relationships? Where do sexuality and gender intersect? And how do families stay together, when external forces are pulling them apart?

TRAILER

REVIEWS

"Gently winning. Speaks volumes about love's adaptability."
New York Times Critics' Pick

"Thought-provoking."
San Francisco Chronicle

"Personal, insightful and gently humorous."
Toronto Star

"Eloquently explores her father’s very intimate transition."
Variety

"No, love isn't sweeping; it's putting brush to canvas and hand to hand.  It's accepting imperfections.  But it's also being willing to recognize the people we love for who they are, to note our own flaws and work to change them."
Village Voice

"Forthright. Well-photographed."
Hollywood Reporter

"Warm and winning. Perceptively lensed."
Film Journal International

"Sympathetic.  Highly personal."
The Globe and Mail

"Thoughtful and moving."
Washington Blade

"Intimate and deeply affecting. It's a must-see"
Women's eNews

"A love story as heartwarming and inspiring as it is unconventional."
Raleigh & Company

"Very intimate. One to watch."
Toronto Film Scene

"An exploration of the meaning of marriage, change, love, and being transgender as [the director] shines a light on her own parents."
Detroit Free Press

"A loving portrait of her father. Refreshing."
PLAYBACK:stl

"When it comes to identity and love and acceptance, this thought-provoking film leaves us with much to chew on."
The Moving World

"A great documentary."
After Ellen

"Has my highest recommendation."
Films etc.

"A beautiful testament to how [the father-daughter] bond can transcend gender through understanding, patience and love."
Black Sheep Reviews

"A very unconventional love story."
CinemaTrek

INTERVIEWS & MEDIA

Bay Area Reporter

"A touching look at romantic and familial love."
Bustle

People

The Advocate

Indiewire

Los Angeles Times

Westword

Hollywood Reporter

Columbus Dispatch

Huffington Post

HuffPost Queer Voices

WBEZ

WCPT

Washington Blade

Voice of America

Windy City Times

Palm Springs Voice

Interlochen Public Radio

STILLS

FTDF Poster